Daily cannabis and reduced risk of steatosis in human immunodeficiency virus and hepatitis C virus-co-infected patients (ANRS CO13-HEPAVIH)

Liver steatosis is common in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-hepatitis C virus (HCV)-co-infected patients. Some recent studies have found that cannabis use is negatively associated with insulin resistance in the general population and in HIV-HCV-co-infected patients. Daily cannabis use may be a protective factor against steatosis in HIV-HCV-co-infected patients. These findings confirm the need for a clinical evaluation of cannabis-based pharmacotherapies in this population.

Medical Cannabis in Parkinson Disease: Real-Life Patients’ Experience

The survey used telephone interviews using a structured questionnaire based on subjective global impressions of change for various parkinsonian symptoms and yes/no questions on adverse effects. Medical cannabis was found to improve symptoms of PD in the initial stages of treatment and did not cause major adverse effects in this pilot, 2-center, retrospective survey. The extent of use and the reported effects lend support to further development of safer and more effective drugs derived from Cannabis sativa.

Therapeutic Value of Medical Marijuana in New Jersey Patients: A Community Partnership Research Endeavor

The Public Health Program at Stockton University partnered with the Compassionate Care Foundation to ascertain the impact of medical marijuana on patients in New Jersey. From a total of 955 patients, patients responding to the surveys varied from 501 for visit 1, 290 for visit 2, to 179 for visit 3. Results provide insight into the diagnoses for which patients used medical marijuana. Results indicate increased mood, general overall condition, and energy as the highest consequences; level of pain in the middle range; and most frequent usage as 3 to 4 times a day. Repeated measures done after visit 2 showed eight statistically significant differences for patients after using medical marijuana: an increase in general quality of life, mobility, and mood, with a decrease in inflammation, intraocular pressure, spasms, seizures, and pain.

Pharmacological Foundations of Cannabis Chemovars

An advanced Mendelian Cannabis breeding program has been developed utilizing chemical markers to maximize the yield of phytocannabinoids and terpenoids with the aim to improve therapeutic efficacy and safety. Specific chemovars may produce enhanced analgesia, anti-inflammatory, anticonvulsant, antidepressant, and anti-anxiety effects, while simultaneously reducing sequelae of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol such as panic, toxic psychosis, and short-term memory impairment.

The endocannabinoid system and its therapeutic exploitation in multiple sclerosis: Clues for other neuroinflammatory diseases

Multiple sclerosis is the most common inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system, caused by an autoimmune response against myelin that eventually leads to progressive neurodegeneration and disability. Although the knowledge on its underlying neurobiological mechanisms has considerably improved, there is a still unmet need for new treatment options, especially for the progressive forms of the disease. Here, we review the preclinical and clinical studies that could explain the therapeutic action of cannabinoid-based medicines, as well as the medical potential of modulating endocannabinoid signaling in multiple sclerosis, with a link to other neuroinflammatory disorders that share common hallmarks and pathogenetic features.

Perspectives on marijuana use and effectiveness: A survey of NARCOMS participants

Interest in and use of marijuana by persons with multiple sclerosis (MS) has increased. While potential benefits have been reported, so have concerns about potential risks. Few large studies have been conducted about the perceptions and current usage of marijuana and medical cannabinoids in persons with MS. The majority of responders favor legalization and report high interest in the use of marijuana for treatment of MS symptoms, but may be reluctant to discuss this with health care providers. Health care providers should systematically inquire about use of marijuana

Medical use of cannabis: Italian and European legislation

This review illustrates some brief considerations of the medical use of cannabis recently issued in Italy. History and uses of cannabis throughout centuries and different countries are illustrated together with a description of botany and active phytocannabinoids. Then, medical use of cannabis anti-pain treatment for patients resistant to conventional therapies is described in case of chronic neuropathic pain, spasticity, for anticinetosic and antiemetic effect in nausea and vomiting caused by chemotherapy, for appetite stimulating effect in cachexia, anorexia, loss of appetite in cancer patients or patients with AIDS and in anorexia nervosa, hypotensive effect in glaucoma resistant to conventional therapies and for reduction of involuntary body and facial movements in Gilles de la Tourette syndrome.

[Beneficial Effect of Medical Cannabis in the Treatment of a Pharmacoresistant Nausea Associated with a Somatoform Disorder in a Patient with Post-Polio Syndrome]

We report a 79-year-old patient with post-polio syndrome (PPS). In the course of this disease, recurrent upper abdominal pain and a therapy-resistant nausea developed without vomiting. In addition, the patient was limited by the combination of muscular weakness, obesity, dietary-treated diabetes and a degenerative spinal cord injury significantly in its mobility and physical capacity. Cannabis is a treatment option for treatment-resistant symptoms as part of a PPS.