The Consumption of Cannabis by Fibromyalgia Patients in Israel

An Internet-based questionnaire was posted to three large fibromyalgia Facebook groups in our country. The questionnaire was anonymous and included demographic, clinical, and cannabis-related questions, including acquisition of a license for medical cannabis (MC) method and amount of cannabis consumption. Cannabis consumption among fibromyalgia patients in our country is very common and is mostly not licensed. Nearly all cannabis consumers (CC_ reported favorable effects on pain and sleep, and few reported adverse effects or feeling of dependence on cannabis.

Cannabis and the Health and Performance of the Elite Athlete

Cannabis (marijuana) is undergoing extensive regulatory review in many global jurisdictions for medical and nonmedical access. Cannabis has potential impact on the health of athletes as well as on performance in both training and in competition. The aim of this general review is to identify and highlight the challenges in interpreting information with respect to elite athletic performance, and to point to important research areas that need to be addressed.

Effect of adding medical cannabis to analgesic treatment in patients with low back pain related to fibromyalgia: an observational cross-over single centre study

Low back pain (LBP) occurs in many patients with fibromyalgia (FM). The current study aimed to assess the possible pain and function amelioration associated with medical cannabis therapy (MCT) in this setting. 31 patients were involved in an observational cross-over study. The patients were screened, treated with 3 months of standardised analgesic therapy (SAT). Following 3 months of this therapy, the patients could opt for MCT and were treated for a minimum of 6 months. This observational cross-over study demonstrates an advantage of MCT in FM patients with LBP as compared with SAT.

Self-management strategies amongst Australian women with endometriosis: a national online survey

Endometriosis has a significant negative impact on the lives of women, and current medical treatments often do not give sufficient pain relief or have intolerable side effects for many women. The majority of women with primary dysmenorrhea use self-management strategies (including self-care techniques or lifestyle choices) to help manage period related symptoms, but little is known about self-management in women with endometriosis. Self-management was very commonly used by women with endometriosis and form an important part of self-management. Women using cannabis reported the highest self-rated effectiveness.

Pharmacology of Medical Cannabis

The Cannabis plant has been used for many of years as a medicinal agent in the relief of pain and seizures. It contains approximately 540 natural compounds including more than 100 that have been identified as phytocannabinoids due to their shared chemical structure. The legalization of cannabis for medicinal purposes and for recreational use in some regions will allow for much needed research on the pharmacokinetics and pharmocology of medical cannabis.

Advances in the Understanding and Management of Chronic Pain in Multiple Sclerosis: a Comprehensive Review

Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune disorder of the central nervous system that can lead to severe physical, cognitive, and neurological deficits that often manifest in young adults. Central neuropathic pain is a common presenting symptom, often prompting patients to seek treatment with opioids, NSAIDS, antiepileptics, and antidepressants despite minimal effectiveness and alarming side-effect profiles. Additionally, spasticity occurs in more than 80% of MS patients and is an important consideration for further study in treatment.

Cannabis-based medicines for chronic pain management: current and future prospects

The medicinal use of cannabis has recently become the focus of much medical, as well as political, attention. The endocannabinoid system is undoubtedly a new and exciting pharmaceutical target for chronic pain management, but transition from preclinical to clinical studies has so far proved difficult. Although it is reasonable to consider cannabinoids for otherwise unresponsive pain, care should be taken in frail clinical populations. As this has become a socioeconomic and political issue in which agendas often take precedence over due diligence, there is a pressing need for unbiased empirical data and high quality evidence to better inform prescribers and patients.

US Veterinarians’ Knowledge, Experience, and Perception Regarding the Use of Cannabidiol for Canine Medical Conditions

Due to the myriad of laws concerning cannabis, there is little empirical research regarding the veterinary use of cannabidiol (CBD). This study used the Veterinary Information Network (VIN) to gauge US veterinarians’ knowledge level, views and experiences related to the use of cannabinoids in the medical treatment of dogs. Overall, CBD was most frequently discussed as a potential treatment for pain management, anxiety and seizures.

Perspectives on cannabis as a substitute for opioid analgesics

With the opioid epidemic reaching new heights in the USA, it has become critical to find suitable alternatives to opioids. Cannabis, an antinociceptive, is a strong contender to help patients reduce their opioid usage. A growing literature has been examining the complex effects cannabis has on pain relief and on opioid usage; whether it is a substitute for opioids or increases their use.